fMRI study of visuospatial processing

Archived Expires 31 October, 2015
This study is not currently open to accept applicants.
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This is an invitation to take part in a research project investigating whether musical expertise can induce changes in the organisation of the brain. I am a PhD student in the area of cognitive neuroscience conducting research at The University of Auckland. I am currently seeking non-musician participants who live in Auckland for a brain imaging study on visuospatial processing.

The research will involve:

  1. filling in a questionnaire about your handedness and demographics, etc (via email)
  2. completing a small array of cognitive tasks at City Campus, Symonds St (1 hour)
  3. undergoing a MRI scan at Grafton Campus, Park Road (2 hours).

During the scan (which takes about 1 hour, and is conducted by trained radiologists) you will be asked to lie still with your head in the scanner, pay attention to a visual display, and to make some responses to simple tasks. We will be measuring the blood oxygen level in your brain while you do this, and pictures of your brain scan will be made available to you if you wish. We are also able to provide a small reimbursement for your time/parking/petrol.

If you think you may be interested to participate and would like further information, please contact me at [email protected]. Thank you, and I hope to hear from you soon!

This study is open to in aged 18 to 50
Healthy volunteers included

** PLEASE NOTE: AT THIS STAGE I AM ESPECIALLY SEEKING PARTICIPANTS WHO FIT THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA: **

  • Male, non-musician, age 18-22.

 

The general criteria for inclusion in the study are as follows:

  1. Native English speaker
  2. Right-handed (use right hand to do most daily things)
  3. Aged between 18 and 50 years old
  4. No major prior neurological conditions (such as stroke or severe epilepsy)
  5. Little or no formal music training
  6. Able/willing to be scanned in an MRI machine (you must have no metal in your body – i.e., pacemaker, metal fragment in eye, implanted surgical metal, etc)